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Wine of the month: Kerloo - Friday, October 26, 2012

Kerloo 2009 Les Collines SYRAH

Vineyards: The astonishing fruit used to produce this Syrah is sourced from Les Collines Vineyard (block 30 and 50) located 5 miles east of Walla Walla. Meaning “the foothills” in French, Les Collines is a 240-acre vineyard sustainably farmed and certified salmon safe with steep elevation changes from the base of the vineyard to the top. This site offers a unique and distinct flavor profile which made crafting a vineyard-designate Syrah ideal.

Vintage: 2009

Blend: 100% Syrah, 20% whole cluster fermented

Alcohol: 14.3%

Price: $36-$37/bottle

Tasting Notes: This is our third vineyard-designate wine from Les Collines Vineyard. The goal with the whole cluster fermentation was to bring some stemmy/earthy tannin structure while the whole berry fermentation was stylistically done to capture the purity of fruit from these amazing blocks. This wine shows intense black licorice, smoke, blueberry, boysenberry, light game and fresh-cracked pepper. Seamless on your palate, this wine showcases elegance with just the right amount of MUSCLE (not unlike the winemaker)!
 

 

 

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Spice Of The Month: Turmeric - Friday, October 19, 2012

TURMERIC:

Turmeric is a pungent Indian spice. It is used in many spice blends as a flavoring and coloring agent.

The flavor of turmeric is often described as buttery and slightly bitter, with a hint of mustard and horseradish. Fresh turmeric is more like ginger, but sweeter and more aromatic.

Origins:
The exact origin of turmeric is not known but it originates from South or Southeast Asia, most probably from western India.
Turmeric is a sterile plant, and does not produce seed. It is thought to have arisen by selection and vegetative propagation of a hybrid between the wild turmeric (Curcuma aromatica), native to India, Sri Lanka and the eastern Himalayas and some other closely related species.

Turmeric has been grown in India since ancient times. It reached China by 700 AD, East Africa by 800 AD and West Africa by 1200. It was introduced to Jamaica in the 18th Century. Today, turmeric is widely cultivated throughout the tropics.

How it grows?
Turmeric is a tropical plant that does well when given abundant heat and moisture. This root will grow well in any region that has a temperate summer, and will die in the winter.

Health Benefits:
Here are 20 reasons to add turmeric to your diet:
1. It is a natural antiseptic and antibacterial agent, useful in disinfecting cuts and burns.
2. When combined with cauliflower, it has shown to prevent prostate cancer and stop the growth of existing prostate cancer.
3. Prevented breast cancer from spreading to the lungs in mice.
4. May prevent melanoma and cause existing melanoma cells to commit suicide.
5. Reduces the risk of childhood leukemia.
6. Is a natural liver detoxifier.
7. May prevent and slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease by removing amyloyd plaque buildup in the brain.
8. May prevent metastases from occurring in many different forms of cancer.
9. It is a potent natural anti-inflammatory that works as well as many anti-inflammatory drugs but without the side effects.
10. Has shown promise in slowing the progression of multiple sclerosis in mice.
11. Is a natural painkiller and cox-2 inhibitor.
12. May aid in fat metabolism and help in weight management.
13. Has long been used in Chinese medicine as a treatment for depression.
14. Because of its anti-inflammatory properties, it is a natural treatment for arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.
15. Boosts the effects of chemo drug paclitaxel and reduces its side effects.
16. Promising studies are underway on the effects of turmeric on pancreatic cancer.
17. Studies are ongoing in the positive effects of turmeric on multiple myeloma.
18. Has been shown to stop the growth of new blood vessels in tumors.
19. Speeds up wound healing and assists in remodeling of damaged skin.
20. May help in the treatment of psoriasis and other inflammatory skin conditions.

History:
Turmeric was probably cultivated at first as a dye, and then became valued as a condiment as well as for cosmetic purposes. It is often used in cooking as a substitute for the more costly saffron. In the 13th century Marco Polo wrote of this spice, marvelling at a vegetable which exhibited qualities so similar to saffron.
Familiar to the contemporary world as a prime component of curry powder, the orange-yellow rhizome's striking colour lent it a special aura in ancient India. It has always been considered an auspicious material in the sub-continent, both amongst the Aryan cultures (mostly northern) and the Dravidian cultures (mostly southern) and its value may extend far in history to the beliefs of ancient indigenous peoples. Turmeric's common name in the north, haldi, derives from the Sanskrit haridra, and in the south it is called manjal, a word that is frequently used in ancient Tamil literature.

Turmeric has a long history of medicinal use in South Asia, cited in Sanskrit medical treatises and widely used in Ayurvedic and Unani systems. Susruta's Ayurvedic Compendium, dating to 250 BC, recommends an ointment containing turmeric to relieve the effects of poisoned food.

 

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